Today I finally took the time to sort though our school supplies plastic box to see what I can put back and what I will consider as trash.

So far we still have a lot of these things:

• Pencils and erasers
• Unopened big box of crayons
• Art/colored/construction paper
• ¼ and ½ sized lined papers
• A pack each of long & short envelopes and long & short folders
• Colored folders
• A lot of used but still ok to recycle folders and envelopes
• A few graphing or Math papers
• Long and short bond papers (we use A4 so we still need to buy these sizes)
• Folder fasteners, staple wires and a few rolls of tapes
• 1/8 illustration boards
• poster paints that dried up a little but can be remedied with some water
• Paint brushes
• 1 drawing book
• 1 ruler
• index cards
• 2 pairs of scissors but one had to go to trash because it just got broken the other day
• 2 file folders

Into the trash went dried up markers, crayons that look tired and worn, scrap papers, broken rulers/scissors, almost empty tape rolls and other stuff.

The plastic envelopes for art supplies just need to be cleaned, otherwise these are still ok to use. TIP: do not scrimp on these, buy the ones that look sturdy even if these are a bit more expensive than others.

For the coming school year, we need to take note of whatever stuff we still have to avoid overbuying. The stuff listed above pretty much sums up what children need for school, unless the teachers ask for specific things like a here folder or a notebook with pink cover. As for the “color coding” notebooks, no sweat for these, just use colored papers to wrap the cover to complete that requirement.

As I have written in another post, having your own school supplies at home, though at first seems a bit too expensive to invest in, would surely make a big difference once the school year starts. Why? You just need to get that long brown folder from your supply rather than go out of your way to buy one from the bookstore or the nearest store that probably sells it. This way, you not only saved on resources you will use for that ONE folder or envelope, you save your sanity too.

It has been months since I’ve written anything in this blog. I’ve been busy with family matters and catching up on my reading and watching of missed TV series favorites.

There are so many changes that has happened in our family and these, like when we used to answer scrapbook questions, are just too many to elaborate.

Blogging, though at a standstill as opposed to real life events that are not posted online, is not a forgotten passion. I still write. I still submit published articles online. Truth be told, I don’t like to call myself a blogger anymore because in some instances, others tend to attach something negative to this “title”.

Year after year, I tell myself I will write more. I still have a lot of ideas and I really have to find time to write because I am bursting with ideas I want to share and not because I have a deadline or a blogging event press release that has a time table.

I like to think I can challenge those few people who come across my blog reading not just about special education but about how to be good parents to their children or how to bring change to themselves and the people around them.

Pretty big to aspire for, right? Right.

Anyway… for this coming school year, I don’t have a child in elementary school anymore and because of that special event, I wrote about Graduation and the Pinoy Family in this article. The son is an incoming 9th grader under the new Philippines K-12 program. The eldest is an incoming Junior in another university. Yep, my children all go to a university that has basic education level.

Professionally, I have several former students who are now college graduates and even a few have PRC licenses. I currently have three former students in college. For this development in the lives of my students and in my standing as a special Ed teacher, I wrote an article on the alternative courses for college students.

I promise to write more and hope to inspire myself to do just that.

Hey Kids! If you want to find out fascinating and interesting links between animals and our everyday world, you have to watch Discovery Kids WILD BUT TRUE. Wild But True will be shown every Tuesday at 5:00pm starting December 2, 2014.

Encores are every Saturday at 9:30am and 1;30pm.

Discovery Kids Wild but True

Wild But True will have Robert Irwin, a naturalist and Isabel Yamazaki, a science geek team up to show how science has made us students of Mother Nature. Each episode will explore nature’s amazing solutions for the different problems in the wild and how we humans can use these blueprints to make our world safer, greener and more efficient and more fun!

Giles, the digital friend who will provide artificial intelligence will help them along the way. He will provide clues that willlead to the answers to the puzzling questions they need answers and help Robert and Isabel hook up with scientists, researchers and developers who will further explain the technology behind their interesting topics.

Experiments will further help them (and you!) better understand the different concepts, features and abilities intrinsic to the wild world.

Are you ready for Discovery Kids WILD BUT TRUE?

Mark your calendars on December 2, 2014 5 pm.

 

Aling Lita used to be a sewer, one who is involved with the tasks of sewing. She still is sewing but at present, she oversees a few other sewers in her home at Quezon City Gawad Kalinga Trese. Two other sewers have sewing machines and work in their homes.

Electrolux transforms worn out clothes into quilts with Gawad Kalinga’s Trese

Together with her husband who is the cutter of the patterns they need to put together to be able to sew quilts to be given to babies, they make up a team of sewers with a good business plan.

Electrolux transforms worn out clothes into quilts with Gawad Kalinga’s Trese

Blog Photos

The bayanihan spirit, the selfless act of giving help to those who need help especially during trying times and calamities have made us Filipinos create ways to do unique things.

In this regard, Electrolux, a global leader in home appliances, with its Delightful-E Simple campaign to collect used clothes and wash these clean before donating to various groups, jump-started a unique idea to transform these used (and washed!) clothes to be made into quilts to be given to babies and children in orphanages and other communities.

Electrolux transforms worn out clothes into quilts with Gawad Kalinga’s Trese

Working together with Gawad Kalinga’s Trese Community in Quezon City, Electrolux will upcycle donated used clothes to make quilts.

Electrolux believes that there must be dignity in the clothes that we donate. To make sure that every piece of clothing is in good condition, we will sort out the worn out, unwearable ones, then upcycle them into quilts with the help of Trese” said Andrea Pionilla, Electrolux Marketing Manager. “With this partnership, we aim not only to give quilts to children and new born babies but also another source of livelihood for this Payatas community.

Partnering with a group of men who make prints on shirts and bags in the same community, these quilts are really made with love. Mike Go of Human Nature oversees the business and guide these groups with their businesses.

Blog Photos

If you and your family and friends want to be a part of this meaningful advocacy, you can donate some pre-loved clothes to be made into quilts in any of these locations:
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 We Filipinos are known to survive the odds we face on a day to day basis. From one of the worst rainy season experience that has occurred called Ondoy, the benchmark of all flooding to come, to Habagat flooding, (to which one refers to depends on the year it happened), earthquakes, mine spills, volcanic eruptions, the recent notable weather disturbance called Mario, are just some of the things we have to deal with from time to time. Put in traffic for those who live in the NCR and we see tired and stressed out people.

In all these weather disturbances and natural calamities (and traffic woes), it is imperative that we are always prepared to face the challenges that will come.

These calamities have brought the best (and of course the worst but I will not dwell in this negativity) in us Filipinos. We say that the Filipino spirit is indomitable and that we show the world how we survive these calamities and how we have not just strengthened our solidarity as Filipinos but how we found compassion and will to serve those who are in need.

In serving others who are in need, we do not do so half-heartedly. We serve with excellence and compassion, in Filipino, husay at malasakit. We show husay at malasakit not only to our family and friends but to those who need help.

When I saw Unilab’s new TVC, it deeply touched my heart to see how the company’s thrust on husay at malasakit hopes to influence not just their viewership but those who have the capacity, time, resources and the willingness in their hearts and spirits to help our country.

Being a mother makes me a partner with my husband as the primary giver of love and care to our family. Just like Unilab, the country’s biggest pharmaceutical company, we also believe in the power of husay and malasakit in rearing our children.

Having been privileged to be able to visit Unilab’s facilities twice, I have seen how technological advances has been incorporated in how they manufacture the supplements a lot of us purchase whether as nutritional supplements or as aid in our physical ailments. To better take care of the Filipinos better, the facilities and procedures are given the utmost safety precautions to make sure that the products are safe and adhere to high quality standards.

Having skin care products from Unilab shows how much technological advances and innovations they have achieved. Unilab also promotes having an active life which makes people healthier. The manufacture of their healthcare products is what will always be the company’s “heart” with the health and safety of the Filipinos at the core.

There are affordable and superior quality healthcare products for those with limited resources assure them that they can still have safe and high quality products. These Unilab products are distributed across the country, from Luzon, Visayas to Mindanao.

Unilab believes in the spirit of genuine concern to make lives better with its husay and malasakit thrust.

As a mom, I believe in companies that show concern and whose products adhere to high quality standards but not too expensive, because this is the way I raise my family: for the children to be the best they can be, to have our needs met using products with high quality standards but without compromising our financial capabilities and to have happy and healthy lives.

As a mom, I believe in Unilab’s husay at malasakit campaign because I am a consumer who buys their products.

Many people remembered Ondoy when Mario came.

No, these are not people’s names but names of weather disturbances that wreaked havoc to the country’s National Capital Region and its suburbs.

Ondoy deluge happened five years ago, on September 26, 2009.

I wrote a post about our experience during Ondoy in this post.

A week after Ondoy ravaged mega Manila, Pepeng did so much damage to the northern part of the country.

Last week, another big weather disturbance wrecked havoc to the same area that Ondoy ravaged. His name is Mario.

In this article I wrote, I asked three people to recount their experience during the two deluges:

Remembering Ondoy

*Louie’s son *Clay spent the night at his Lola’s  home in Marikina. Lola’s home is a two-storey house near the Tumana River. During Ondoy, he slept on the roof together with his Lola and Yaya  while his dad, Louie (and their dogs) slept on the roof of his SUV at their house in Cainta.

*Faye, who just gave birth to her second child, a daughter, spent their time on the second floor of their home with her husband, her son and his nanny during the onslaught of Ondoy. When the rains let up, they walked on top of fences to go to a higher place and seek refuge. They spent a few months at Faye’s family home in Rizal while their home was being repaired after cleaning up was done.

*Anne recalls Ondoy vividly as if it happened yesterday:

“Ondoy brought ceiling-high flood waters into our home, causing us to take refuge in a neighbor’s house opposite ours. The flood rose so quickly, we fled with only the clothes on our back, our wallets which could not buy us any food, and our mobile phones which soon either ran out of load or battery juice.

“We took turns sleeping in a room provided for us by the kind neighbor or looking out the window watching the water gobble up our house — roof and all — in a matter of an hour and later recede inch by painful inch over the following two days and two nights. We were hungry, wet and dirty; worried over our two girls who were stranded in Quezon City; and anxious over our dogs whom we left behind.”

The Mario experience.

Louie and Clay did not have to experience the recent floods that ravaged Cainta because they left the place soon after Ondoy to live someplace else that is flood-free.

Anne and her family also put up their stuff on the second floor of their homes. After Mario left, she woke up to an organized home, thankful the waters stopped short of their gate and for extra hands that moved furniture and stuff back where they belong.

Faye and family were as fortunate. The flood only threatened but didn’t quite enter their house. However, they now have to move their stuff back to the first floor. Hard work, she says, but still a breeze, compared to what they went through during Ondoy.

Lessons from Ondoy… read the complete article here at the Philippine Online Chronicles.

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