Posted by teacherjulie @ 8:52 am

In my line of work as a Special Ed teacher, it helps to understand and try to see the reasons why the parents of my (current and would-be) students say or do things that seem to question my abilities to teach their child. It still seems controversial to me, no matter how long I have taught and how much I have valued my work as a reflection not just of my abilities to teach, but as a reflection of the values I hold dear, as a mother and as a professional.

Maybe these parents are still reeling from the fact that their children have been given a diagnosis that they themselves have been suspecting before it was officially written on paper.

Maybe these parents feel vulnerable and are afraid to know what the future will be like when their children are older: will they be able to cope, adjust, be like the typically developing children, will their potentials be developed and be tapped for them to be independent citizens?

In everything, it is for the benefit of the child, and his/her family if the parents are willing to cooperate and work with the people who will help them develop the full potentials of the child(ren).

As a special education teacher, my work is not done at the end of our one-on-one sessions. There would be times when I get frantic messages or calls. There would be times when parents and I discuss at length what needs to be done, only to repeat the same conversation after a day or two. Being a teacher does not entail just working with a child but working cooperatively with his/her parents and family. In doing so, working together with the parents and the other auxiliary service providers gives the child the best advantage in tapping and developing his/her full potential. The journey won’t be easy nor short, but it is a start.

This entry was posted on Thursday, September 29th, 2016 at 8:52 am and is filed under Being a (Special Ed) Teacher, Challenge Yourself, Lessons in Life, special education. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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